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Problem 894: Yasin Shale - Helpmate
yasin.shale(14.05.2018) Nice helpmate by the turkish author. Welcome to Yasin Shale!
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
894
 
1.Sf5 Qh6 2.Ke5 Rxe4#
 
1.Bf4 Qa1 2.Kf5 Bxe4#
 
 
Gate opening, selfblock, mate on the same square.
(Author)
 

Comments  

 
+9 #1 Francesco 2018-05-14 10:26
The author should revise the construction, since it can be improved, but I don't give any suggestion.
In my opinion it's better to let each author the pleasure to provide himself with his own composition.
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+7 #2 Rajendiran Raju 2018-05-14 11:50
Exact unity between the Solutions !
Good Starter from novice composer ,
Nice Suggestion from senior composer ,

White's first move in both the solutions check , that's missed here.
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+1 #3 Yasin ?ale 2018-05-18 23:33
Hello KoBulChess familiy!

Dear Francesco and Rajendiran Raju, thank you for valuable comments.

As our editor wrote, this is my first problem published ever. For me, it would be great to hear your concrete recommendations. Anyway, i have another version for this problem:

81K1p4r2k42rN1p23p3q2B2PP13R

Solution:

1. Kxd5 f4
2. Re6 Rxd4#
1. Ke5 Sf4
2. d6 Bxd4#

I already had this version but i gave the priority to my first one since it starts with Queen move.

In this version, King's first key accepts sacrifice on d5, but the second does not. Besides, keys also allow black for blocking moves 2. d6 and 2. Re6. Moreover, white's both moves are on the same squares: on f4 and mates on d4 by capture. I think these elements present unity between solutions.

I would like to hear your comments.
Best regards.
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+3 #4 Francesco 2018-05-19 08:05
Hello Yasin Shale and congratulations on your first problem!
Also the version is nice, in my opinion, with also W1 in the same square.
The solution 1.Ke5 is well done. The wS has two choices to guard the squares d5, e6 but its move is specified by the necessity to interfere the bQ.
In the solution 1.Kd5, however, the move 1...f4 is weak, interference and guard without choices. Also the bQ is weak, since it plays as a rook.
My first comment simply referred to the fact that you can improve construction of the nice 894 without necessarily changing the original strategy.
Perhaps the two problems may be considered as indipendent and partecipate both to the tourney.
All the best,
Francesco Simoni
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+1 #5 Francesco 2018-05-21 19:41
Can someone kindly make the diagram of the version in post #3? I prefer the original position, but I recommend some adjustments of the economy.
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+1 #6 Kenan Velikhanov 2018-05-21 22:01
There is an opportunity to save much in the first version. Yasin is capable and he will do it.
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0 #7 Yasin ?ale 2018-05-22 03:02
After Fancesco's recommendation of economy, i made some adjustments on the original problem, and it turned to a meredith with twelve pieces. Here is the position:
87b2K1nk26q14p2n3B1P24R32b4Q

Solution:
1.Sf5 Qh6+
2.Ke5 Rxe4#

1.Bf4 Qa1+
2.Kf5 Bxe4#

Here, a group of black pawns and rook on d8 left their places to queen, knight and a pawn. As Kenan Velikanov stated, indeed it's saved very much in the first version.
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0 #8 Yasin ?ale 2018-05-22 03:36
Sorry for misunderstanding and unnecessary traffic of my comments. I could not find way to cancel my comment #8 (yes exactly this comment!) If one of admins do not mind, can one of them remove the comment #8.

Thanks.
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+3 #9 Francesco 2018-05-22 05:56
Quoting Yasin ?ale:
After Fancesco's recommendation of economy, i made some adjustments on the original problem, and it turned to a meredith with twelve pieces. Here is the position:
87b2K1nk26q14p2n3B1P24R32b4Q

Solution:
1.Sf5 Qh6+
2.Ke5 Rxe4#

1.Bf4 Qa1+
2.Kf5 Bxe4#

This version is not good. The white pawn guards the square of mates, so the piece that supports the mating one does nothing.
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+3 #10 Francesco 2018-05-22 08:40
Quoting Yasin ?ale:
After Fancesco's recommendation of economy, i made some adjustments on the original problem...
In any case, I do not recommend the use of that white pawn, which takes a flight in only one of the two solutions.
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+1 #11 Kenan Velikhanov 2018-05-22 12:34
White bishop does not need to control the field e4 with d3, it can be rearranged and then a white pawn will not be needed. And such a success can be removed from the game of the black queen, who is weakly involved.
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+1 #12 Francesco 2018-05-23 07:05
Quoting Kenan Velikhanov:
White bishop does not need to control the field e4 with d3, it can be rearranged and then a white pawn will not be needed. And such a success can be removed from the game of the black queen, who is weakly involved.

No big changes are needed. The author could simply rework the first position 894 without modify the strategic content, inspired by some of the constructive elements he used in the version at # 7, but without the need for a white pawn.
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0 #13 Kenan Velikhanov 2018-05-23 14:56
I, too, about this. Do not need big changes. I just hinted to the author that if he moved an bishop from d3 to f3 and added two black pawns g4 and g5 everything would be fixed.
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+2 #14 Francesco 2018-05-23 19:01
it was better to let the author discover it by himself. :roll:
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+1 #15 Kenan Velikhanov 2018-05-23 20:27
I have no doubt about Yasin's abilities. We did not work much with him and I was convinced of this. I'm sure and I hope he will be a good composer!
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0 #16 Yasin ?ale 2018-05-23 21:40
Quote:
I just hinted to the author that if he moved an bishop from d3 to f3 and added two black pawns g4 and g5 everything would be fixed.


In conclusion, following position sets in:

87b2K1nk26p14p1pn5B24R32b4Q

Solution:

1. Sf5 Qh6+
2. Ke5 Rxe4#
1. Bf4 Qa1+
2. Kf5 Bxe4#

Thanks for valuable comments and discussion.
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-1 #17 Nikola Predrag 2018-05-23 22:54
bBh7 is an unpleasant cookstopper because it accidentally adds the 3rd, line-closing motivation for 1.Sf5.
I wonder why anyone would like bPe4 which is there just to present the White's brutality.
wR could stand e.g. on a4 and wB on g2, without bPe4.
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-2 #18 Kenan Velikhanov 2018-05-24 03:30
Nikola's tip reveals other possibilities! In the next position, the content became even richer.
b71Qr51b63nk35p2R74B1K
1. Rc4 (R~) Qe7
2. Kd4 Rd3#
1. Be3 (B~) Qb2
2. Ke4 Bd3#
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+1 #19 Kenan Velikhanov 2018-05-24 10:08
When the rubric of chess composition was conducted in the newspaper "Olimpiya Dunyasi", many people interested in the composition sent their works. The editor of the rubric sent these tasks to me for verification. To improve the quality of tasks, I gave advice to authors. Unfortunately, this method did not give a good result. Because of the complexity, many simply stopped compiling. Experience has shown that for beginner composers, it is important to show examples of compilation techniques. With two students we went exactly with this method. With the work of Aydan Huseynzade and Azer Abbasov you are already familiar.
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+1 #20 Nikola Predrag 2018-05-24 13:36
As Francesco mentioned, in the other Yasin's version 1...f4 is an accidental line-interference.
Moving wRd2 to b4, removing wPf3 and adding wSf2 would motivate 1.Kxd5 Sg4!(Sd3?).
(Actually, wSf2 could be on e5 and captured in the other phase.)

Also, anti-dual 1.Ke5-2.d6(Rd6?) exists only in one phase, so having 2 different blockers for e6/d6 spoils the economy (a single bP could block both squares).

As the construction develops, some new possibilities occur. For instance, a new pair of phases might be considered to get Pickaniny (perhaps not very good but at least in Meredith).
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