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KoBulChess Twomovers 2012 AWARD

logo(05.03.2013) Here is the Award of KoBulChess Twomovers 2012. After the shocking news about the death of Milan Velimirovic (who was the original judge of the tourney) I asked his compatriot, friend and great twomover expert Marjan Kovacevic to replace him as a judge. I appreciate the Marjan's agreement and thank him a lot for his quick and excellent job!

 

 

KoBulChess Twomovers 2012 - Award

   It was a sad but obligatory duty to replace my long time friend Milan Velimirovic as the judge. He thought he should support this young tourney, and I’ll try to do the same.

   With only 14 entries the first KoBulChess #2 tourney didn’t offer Prize-level renderings, but all of the problems were quite pleasant to analyze, and half of them reached the award. What I asked from the winners was the clarity of a relatively complex idea, and a fresh mechanism in a good construction.


220121

1.HM – No.42, Diyan Kostadinov

   1.a8Q? (2.Qf4# X)

1…S:h2 a 2.Sf2# A, 1…Qb7 b 2.Sc5# B, 1…c6!

   1.Rh4? (2.Sf2# A)

1…Sf4 2.Q:f4# X, 1…Qc5 e 2.S:c5# B, 1…Qd4 c 2.S:d2# C,1…Qb6!

  1.c3!? (2.S:d2# C)

1…Sge3 f 2.Sf2# A, 1…Q:b2 g 2.Sc5# B, 1…K:d3 d 2.Qe2# D, 1…Q:c3!

  1.Be3!! (2.Sg5#)

1…K:e3 h 2.Qe2# D, 1…Q:e7 i 2.S:d2# C, 1…Sg:e3 f 2.Sf2# A

Not less that five mates circle around the four phases and change their roles, including transferences and the threats. The transferences of 2.Sc5# are least convincing. They depend on the change of the threat only, but one has to appreciate how the author managed to motivate different defences by BQ, and to avoid any possible repetition.

There are two pairs of well linked phases, and the excellent key-move makes the solution the most prominent phase – just the way it should be. The only technical compromise is the use of WPa7 for one try only.

2.HM – No.1, Evgeniy Permyakov

   1. Qg8! (2.Qf7#)

1...Kf5 2.Qg6# A / Qg5# B, 1...Rc7 2.Qg5# B / Sg4# C,

1...Qh7 2.Sg4# C, S:h7# D, 1...Q:e6 2.Sh7# D / Qg6# A

1...Qg6 2.Q:g6# A / Sd7# E, 1...Q:f4 2.Sd7# E / Sg4# C,

1...Qb7 2.Sg4# C / Qg6# A

Two sets of cyclic duals in an amazing construction. I have to say I neither like duals as thematic content, nor the fact that both sets use the same mates in an unbalanced 4+3 form. However, the construction and the clarity deserve a high recognition.

3.HM – No.26, Zivko Janevski

1…B:b5 x 2.Qb3# (2.Qc4? C K:c4!; 2.Q:e4? B K:e4!), 

1…Bc4 2.Qd6#, 1…Se5 2.Se7#

   1.Sc5?(2.B:c6#)

1…B:b5 x 2.Q:e4# B (2.Qb3? A Bc4!, 2.Qc4? C K:c4,B:c4!), but 1…Se5!

   1.Bg7?(2.Se7#), 1…Bc5 2.S:f4#, but 1…Sf6!

   1.Bd6?(2.Se7#) 1…R:h7!

   1.Sd6!(2.B:c6#)

1…B:b5 x 2.Qc4# C (2.Qb3? A Kc5!, 2.Q:e4? B Kc5!), 1…Se5 2.Se7#

An interesting choice of mates after the self-pinning 1…B:b5 defence in the three main phases. The pair of the by-tries by WBf8 stress the role of 2.Se7#.


220122

1.Comm. – No.4, Zivko Janevski

1…R:e6 x 2.Qd5#, 1…Rd5 2.Q:d5#, 1…Se3 2.S:f2# A

     1.Qf6?(2.Q:e5#), 1...R:e6 x 2.Q:f5#, 1…K:d4 2.Q:e5#, 1…Rd5!

     1.S:c4? (2.Sf2# A), 1…Be3 2.Sc3#, 1…Be1!

     1.Sd7?(2.Sf6#), 1…K:d4 2.S:c5# (2.Sf6?), 1…R:e6 x 2.S:c5#, 1…Rd5!

     1.Sd5! [2.Sf6# (S:f2? A)], 1…K:d4 2.S5c3# (Sf6?), 

1…R:e6 x 2.S:f2# A, 1…R:d5 2.Q:d5#

Two phases with K-Schiffmann, 4x1 change after 1…R:e6 and a nice transference of 2.S:f2#, appearing also as a threat.

2.Comm. – No.25, Bosko Miloseski

1...Ka2 2.Ra3#

   1.Qa8? Ra7!, 1.Qf8? Re7!, 1.Qd8? Rd7!, 1.Qg8? Rf7!

   1.Q:h2! (2.Bd5,Be4,Bf3,Bh3#), 1...Rd7/ Re7/ Rf7/ Rh7 2.Bd5/ Be4/ Bf3/ Bh3#

Fifthfold abandoning of the WQ-WR battery brings WQ-BR duel in 4 tries, and a BR-WB duel in the 4 variations. A wonderfully open Meredith position.

3.Comm. – No.3, Diyan Kostadinov

   1.Sb3!? (2.S:d2#), 1…K:d3 2.Sc5#, 1…d5!

   1.Se2!? [2.S:g3# (Sc3?)], 1…Kf3 a 2.Sc3# A (S:g3?), 1…Rh3!

   1.Sb5!! [2.S:d6# (Sc3?)], 1…Kd5 c 2.Sc3# A (S:d6?),

1…K:f5 2.Qg6#, 1…Qf8 d 2.Q:e6# B

   1.S:e6? [2.Sg5# (Sc5?)], 1…Q:e6 b 2.Q:e6# B, 1…d5!

A BK star allowed by 3 flight-giving moves was presented in the partial predecessor (see Appendix). Here we have more battery mates and feel pity there is no another one, after 1...K:f5. I couldn’t take seriously the capturnig try 1.S:e6?? 


220123

4.Comm. – No.59, Nikolay Dimirov

   1.Sc~? (2.Re4#), 1…Se5!

   1.Se7!! (2.Sd5#), 1…Sb4 2.Bd6#, 1…Se5 2.Se2#

1…Ke3 2.Qf2#, 1…f:g6 2.S:g6#

Another dynamic position with excellent key move, supported by the Threat correction logic.

   My congratulations to the winners, with hopes this tourney will keep improving, the way it deserves.

Marjan Kovacevic,

International judge of the FIDE

Appendix

 

1.Se2? (2.Qb7#), 1…Ke4 2.Sf4#, 1…e4 2.Sf4#, 1…Sb6!

1.Sf5? (2.Qb3#), 1…Ke6 2.Se3#, 1…e4 2.Se3#, 1…Sb6!

1.Sc2! (2.Qb5#), 1…Kc4/Kc6 2.Qb3/Qb7#, 1…e4 2.Se3#

 

 

Comments  

 
+1 #1 Diyan Kostadinov 2013-04-05 04:58
Claims were not received, the Award become final.
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